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Overdose Prevention/Naloxone and Fentanyl Test Strips

What are fentanyl test strips? 

Fentanyl Test Strips are a tool to identify the presence of fentanyl in unregulated drugs. Fentanyl is an extremely potent drug that has been found in many different substances (such as cocaine, ecstasy, and other opioids), usually without the knowledge of the person using the substance. It is recommended that you test any substance you plan to consume to check for the presence of fentanyl. 

What is Nasal Naloxone/ Narcan? 

Naloxone (brand name Narcan) is an easy to use nasal spray medication that can reverse opioid overdose when used right away.

Signs of an Opioid Overdose

Opioid overdose is life-threatening and requires immediate emergency attention. Recognizing the signs of opioid overdose is essential to saving lives.

If a person exhibits ANY of the following symptoms, Call 911 immediately and administer Narcan (if you have it):

  • Their face is extremely pale and/or feels clammy to the touch
  • Their body goes limp
  • Confusion
  • Their fingernails or lips have a purple or blue color
  • They start vomiting or making gurgling noises
  • They cannot be awakened or are unable to speak
  • Their breathing or heartbeat slows or stops

Will I face legal consequences if I call 911 in an overdose situation?

AB 472, California's 911 Good Samaritan law, provides limited protection from arrest, charge and prosecution for people who seek emergency medical assistance at the scene of a suspected drug overdose. It protects from charges for low-level drug offenses such as possession of a controlled substance for personal use and being under the influence of a controlled substance. It does NOT protect from charges for high-level drug offenses such as driving under the influence or engaging in sales of controlled substances. 

What if I am unsure if someone is experiencing a fentanyl overdose?

Naloxone is very safe and does not have adverse side effects when given to someone who is not experiencing a fentanyl overdose. If they have used something other than opioids, or if they have opioids and additional substances in their body, the Naloxone will not have any effect. If you suspect someone is experiencing an overdose and you have Naloxone, use it, and call 911. It is always better to be safe than sorry. 

Instructions on how to use Nasal Naloxone (Narcan):

Nasal Naloxone Quick Start Guide

Youtube Video on how to use Narcan

Youtube Video on how to use Narcan in Spanish

Youtube Video on how to use Narcan in Mandarin

Youtube Video on how to use Narcan in ASL 

Instructions on how to use Fentanyl Test Strips:

Youtube Video on how to use test strips 

Youtube Video on how to use test strips in Spanish

Resources to get Narcan/Fentanyl Test Strips at UC Santa Barbara:

Gaucho for Recovery 

Gauchos for Recovery provides Overdose Prevention Kits that include Naloxone (NARCAN) and Fentanyl test strips free of charge to UCSB students, staff, faculty, and Isla Vista residents. Kits are available for pick-up or delivery, no questions asked. No identifying information will be collected. These kits are limited to one kit per one person as they are unable to provide large quantities to individuals. They also train you how to use Narcan and the test strips in 5 minutes or less. 

Pickup Locations: 

All pickup is in Embarcadero Hall Rm 1105  (first floor, entrance across from Caje/Woodstock's)

Monday: 3-6 , Tuesday: 10-11:30, Wednesday: 12:30-3, Thursday: 10-11:30, 1-3:30, and 4-6

If you need a kit outside of those times email Hugh_cook@ucsb.edu to arrange pickup.

You can also follow GFR on Instagram for additional pickup times and distribution events. Instagram: @gauchos_for_recovery

Resources to get Narcan/Fentanyl Test Strips in Santa Barbara:

Cottage Hospital – Santa Barbara, Goleta, and Santa Ynez Valley

Cottage Health hospitals provide 24-hour emergency care and Naloxone (NARCAN) distribution. NARCAN is available free of charge in the Emergency Departments at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital, Goleta Valley Cottage Hospital and Santa Ynez Valley Cottage Hospital. Anyone who comes to the Emergency Department and requests NARCAN can receive it unconditionally and anonymously. Whether you use substances or love someone who does, you can get NARCAN at Cottage with no questions asked.

Website: https://adp.sa.ucsb.edu/gfr/overdose-prevention-naloxone 

Lompoc Valley Medical Center Emergency Department

24-hour emergency care and Naloxone distribution. LVMC's Emergency Department is a distribution site for Naloxone. People at risk of an opioid-related overdose, or a person who is a family member, friend or anyone in a position to assist a person at risk, may go to LVMC's Emergency Department and request a free box of Naloxone. That person must be willing to learn the basic elements of overdose prevention and how to administer Naloxone nasally. Naloxone is distributed for Free.

Phone Number: (805) 737-3333

Website: lompocvmc.com 

Pacific Pride Foundation

Regional Naloxone distribution. Please call (805) 963-3636 or email hello@pacificpridefoundation.org for current information regarding community Naloxone distribution times and locations.

Phone Number: (805) 963-3636

Website: pacificpridefoundation.org

Santa Barbara County Department of Behavioral Wellness – Alcohol and Drug Programs

Community members may request Naloxone for personal use by completing the Naloxone Now SB request form, by calling (805) 681-5323 or by attending a Naloxone distribution event at your place (dates and times for distribution events are posted on the calendar on the website). Requests through Naloxone Now SB or by telephone will be processed within two business days and mailed within 3-5 business days.

Phone Number: (805) 681-5323

Naloxone Request Form SB